EAF-Nansen Programme launches marine expedition to explore deep-sea habitats in the Sierra Leone Rise 21 January 2022

Nansen’s first scientific survey in 2022 is taking the research vessel – Dr Fridtjof Nansen – to survey a number of selected seamounts of the Sierra Leone Rise, in areas beyond national jurisdiction (ABNJ), within the area of the Fishery Committee for the Eastern Central Atlantic (CECAF). During the month-long survey (postponed from 2020 due to the COVID-19 pandemic), the expedition team will investigate seabed habitats, and in particular document the presence and distribution of Vulnerable Marine Ecosystems  (VMEs), such as sponge aggregations, cold-water coral reefs and coral gardens, for which special protection is required from possible impacts that may occur during bottom fishing activities. The survey will also map pelagic and demersal fisheries resources as well as provide an opportunity to sample zooplankton in selected areas.

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Meet four of the Largest discovered Cephalopods

When it comes to our favorite ocean animals, I think it’s safe to say octopuses are very high on the list. Here at Ocean Conservancy, we just can’t get enough of cephalopods. They are unique, interesting and mesmerizing. And, just when you think you’ve learned all about them—you find out something new!

The marine animal class of Cephalopoda includes octopuses, squid, cuttlefish and nautiluses. The name “cephalopod” comes from the fact that their arms are connected directly to their heads. Octopus have eight arms, while squid and cuttlefish have eight arms plus two other specialized appendages, called tentacles.

You’ve heard of monsters of the deep—but which cephalopod is the biggest? Which is the true monster lurking in the sea? Let’s dive in and find out if it is colossal or giant!

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One Ocean Summit: UNESCO calls on countries to include ocean education in school curricula by 2025 UNESCO, 11.02.2022

On the One Ocean Summit taking place in Brest, France, UNESCO announced it has set itself the goal of including ocean education in the school curricula of its 193 Member States by 2025. To achieve this goal, the United Nations agency is making available to public decision-makers a toolkit with a shared reference framework of educational content on the ocean.

In the aftermath of the Second World War, some countries advocated the sharing of oceanographic knowledge on a global scale. However, it was not until December 1960 that the Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission of UNESCO – the first body responsible for strengthening intergovernmental co-operation in the marine sciences – was created.

 UNESCO will monitor the implementation of this objective by its 193 Member States. A first progress report is planned for COP27, which will be held in November 2022 in Egypt.

 

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Madagascar, southern Africa brace for more tropical storms

Even as southern African nations assess the devastation caused earlier this month by Cyclone Batsirai, a new tropical storm is approaching as the Indian Ocean region is confronted by an intense cyclone season.

Tropical Storm Dumako is projected to slam into the northeastern coast of Madagascar Tuesday evening, according to the U.N.'s regional meteorology center in Reunion. Dumako, the fourth storm this year, is forecast to make landfall near Madagascar's Antalaha town.

About eight to 12 more cyclones may hit southern Africa and nearby islands in the Indian Ocean before the cyclone season ends in May, part of an increase in recent years of extreme tropical storms in the Southern Hemisphere, according to the U.N. Meteorological Organization.

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At One Ocean Summit, Seychelles’ President and Norway’s PM become Patrons of the Ocean Decade Alliance IOC-UNESCO, 15.02.2022

The Prime Minister of Norway and the President of the Republic of Seychelles have accepted UNESCO’s invitation to become Patrons of the Ocean Decade Alliance to generate worldwide support of the United Nations Decade of Ocean Science for Sustainable Development 2021-2030 (‘Ocean Decade’).

The announcements made during the One Ocean Summit (9-11 February 2022, Brest, France) add weight to the group of eminent individuals already engaged in the Ocean Decade Alliance. Through its members, the Alliance’s mandate is to catalyse support for the Ocean Decade through targeted resource mobilization, networking and influence, leveraging and multiplying financial and in-kind resource commitments.

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At One Ocean Summit, Seychelles’ President and Norway’s PM become Patrons of the Ocean Decade Alliance

The Prime Minister of Norway and the President of the Republic of Seychelles have accepted UNESCO’s invitation to become Patrons of the Ocean Decade Alliance to generate worldwide support of the United Nations Decade of Ocean Science for Sustainable Development 2021-2030 (‘Ocean Decade’).

The announcements made during the One Ocean Summit (9-11 February 2022, Brest, France) add weight to the group of eminent individuals already engaged in the Ocean Decade Alliance. Through its members, the Alliance’s mandate is to catalyse support for the Ocean Decade through targeted resource mobilization, networking and influence, leveraging and multiplying financial and in-kind resource commitments.

 

Focusing on action and jointly developed solutions, the Ocean Decade Alliance will support all forms of ocean science to successfully deliver the Decade’s vision and thus contribute to the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development.

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